Explore South East Cornwall

St Neot church has rare medieval windows. In May the village celebrates Oak Apple Day, when a fresh oak branch is hoisted to the top of the church tower to celebrate Charles II. St Neot was Royalist during the Civil War. The London Inn serves very good food.

Just down the road are Carnglaze Caverns, deep man-made slate caves set in a lovely Cornish garden, which served as the Navy’s rum store in World War Two and now has concerts underground (and you can get married there, too).

Carnglaze Caverns, image Derek Hawkins
Carnglaze Caverns, image Derek Hawkins

The nearest town is Liskeard, five miles away on the main railway line to London (or Penzance). A branch line will take you eight miles to Looe through delightful countryside.

Liskeard, which received its royal charter in 1240, was one of up to seven Cornish stannary towns – where refined tin was assayed, taxed and sold until the tax was abolished in 1838. The mining boom brought prosperity in the 19th century, reflected in the town’s architecture. These days it still has a cattle market and made news when Mary Portas descended as part of her government-sponsored plan to help local high streets. Try the resulting Roadkill Pie from Warrens, the excellent local butcher.

The town also has a museum and Stuart House, where Charles I once spent a night and which is now a cultural centre with lovely courtyard garden and cafe.

Stuart House, image Humphrey Bolton
Stuart House, image Humphrey Bolton